macteenbooks:

I just get really emotional about people that don’t exist. #dontjudge

macteenbooks:

I just get really emotional about people that don’t exist. #dontjudge


erikkwakkel:

Books on the go

There is nothing like reading outside. While we share this sentiment with medieval readers, back then you couldn’t just bring any book with you. Most of them had bindings with oak boards and were as big as modern magazines. As a result, even regular-size books weighed as much as a bag of potatoes. Pre-modern binders, clever lads, came up with different solutions to carry a book on your body. The most common one was to fit it with a leather wrapper that included a knot, which you could stick under your belt (Pic 3). Smaller and lighter objects, like a thin almanac (pic 4) or a prayerbook, such as the one owned by Anne Boleyn (Pic 1), could simply be tied to the belt with a string. The most elegant solution, however, is shown off by the red Arabic manuscript, which is to fit the book in a neat pouch, carried in your hand (Pic 2). With these techniques it was not so much an issue how to take a book with you, but through what means to do so. Off you go!

Pics and additional information - Pic 1 (top): London, British Library, Stowe MS 956, copied c. 1540 (more here); Pic 2 (red pouch): Arabic manuscript of c. 1650, Royal Library Stockholm (more here); Pic 3 (knot): New Haven, Beinecke Library, MS 84, copied in England, 15th century (more here); Pic 4 (cloth binding): recently purchased by the Wellcome Library in London (more here). More on such “girdle books” here and here

(via americanlibraryassoc)


naturallysteph:

Illustration by clthin.

naturallysteph:

Illustration by clthin.


Dinner is served! #platedpics

Dinner is served! #platedpics


naturallysteph:

 Isla and the Happily Ever illustration by emma-tobias.

naturallysteph:

 Isla and the Happily Ever illustration by emma-tobias.



WHEN THE ILS GOES DOWN AFTER TECH SUPPORT HOURS


fishingboatproceeds:

writingofcourse:

Our town paints fire hydrants. 2014’s theme is books! Here is their ode to John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars.
The artist for this hydrant is Paul Siegfried.  It’s located on the corner of Jefferson and Warren St, Huntington, IN 46750. Presented by the Huntington Arts Initiative, this year’s theme is Book, Look…and Listen!

File under Things I Did Not Anticipate While Writing TFIOS.

fishingboatproceeds:

writingofcourse:

Our town paints fire hydrants. 2014’s theme is books! Here is their ode to John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars.

The artist for this hydrant is Paul Siegfried.  It’s located on the corner of Jefferson and Warren St, Huntington, IN 46750. Presented by the Huntington Arts Initiative, this year’s theme is Book, Look…and Listen!

File under Things I Did Not Anticipate While Writing TFIOS.


You must know … surely, you must know it was all for you. You are too generous to trifle with me. I believe you spoke with my aunt last night, and it has taught me to hope as I’d scarcely allowed myself before. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes have not changed, but one word from you will silence me forever.”

(via ellevvoods)



effervescentlassie:

Anna and the French Kiss symbols + meaning

(via naturallysteph)


(via ellevvoods)